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7/12/2007

The Clancy Brothers play Leaving of Liverpool

By Scott. Filed under: TweedBlog, video.

My Youtube bender continues, this time featuring the Clancy Brothers doing a nice version of Leaving of Liverpool:

Tangleweed recorded this one on our second cd, Where You Been So Long?.

You can hear one of our rare live versions from The Ark in Ann Arbor, MI here, or you can download the entire show here

Reviewer calls WYBSL ‘an ideal Americana album’

By Kenneth Rainey. Filed under: News, Reviews, TweedBlog. Tags:

We got a very positive review for Where You Been So Long over at Indie-Music.com. Reviewer Charles Martin said some kind things about the record, complimenting the diversity of styles represented, and our energetic playing. He calls Where You Been So Long? an ‘Ideal Americana Album’:

Every music form has a formula, and great albums are born from a band’s ability to both conform to and defy the formula. Tangleweed has put together an ideal Americana album, with tracks that play directly to the roots crowd, and with others that veer off into psychobilly and even a bit of gypsy folk. They play their musical eccentricities shrewdly, never meandering too far from the campfire that they become inaccessible, but never lingering in one spot so long they become tedious.

With the tragic breakup of Texas-based The Meat Purveyors, Tangleweed could step into the void to inject some high octane energy to the roots scene. “With a Bottle in My Hand/Farewell Blues” races with a blistering pace while spouting endearing lines such as “I don’t need a bottle to tell me what to do, just like I don’t need a lightning bolt to cut my steak in two.”

They aren’t all piss and vinegar though; there are relaxed gems throughout such as the bar ballad “Leaving of Liverpool” and the creeping sing-a-long “Drunkard’s Blues.” Tangleweed seems to approach Americana with academic fascination, much like the Decemberist’s Colin Meloy’s love of European folk and sea shanties. The result is an endearing and vigorous study of the culture that originally spawned the music.

Many thanks to the folks over at indie-music.com for their kind words.

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